Great Fall Vegetable Chef J9 Chooses For Your Health

We love fall. Fall is the harvest season. And the vegetables are in abundance, and taste best.


Here are the list of fall harvest season vegetables Chef J9 typically chooses for the best flavor and greatest value when creating the Comfort Keto recipes.


Artichokes have a second crop in the fall (the first go-around is in the spring) that produces small to medium artichokes.


Arugula is a cool weather peppery green harvested in winter in warm climates, summer in cool ones, and grows in many places during autumn. We use arugula often in our fall salads.


Belgian Endive has a traditional season (when grown in fields and covered with sand to keep out the light), like that of all chicories, in late fall and winter. We use endive occasionally in our fall salads.


Broccoli is more sweet, less bitter and sharp when harvested in the cooler temperatures of fall in most climates. We always use broccoli as a great side dish in our fall recipes.


Brussels Sprouts grow on a stalk, and if you see them for sale that way snap them up - they'll last quite a bit longer than once they're cut. We occasionally use Brussel sprouts as a side dish in our fall recipes.


Cabbage is bright and crisp when raw and mellows and sweetens the longer it's cooked. The cooler the weather when it's harvested, the sweeter it tends to taste (this effect is called "frost kissed"). We use cabbage often in our fall salads and also Asian dishes.


Carrots are harvested year-round in temperate areas. Unusual varieties are harvested during the carrot's natural season, which is late summer and fall. We use carrots often in our fall salads and also Asian dishes.


Cauliflower may be harvested year-round, but it is by nature a cool weather crop at its best from fall into early spring. We always use riced or steamed cauliflower in our recipes throughout the year.


Celery is at its best in the fall, with its harvest continuing through winter in warm and temperate climates. We use celery often in our fall salads and also Asian dishes.


Chard like all cooking greens, chard turns bitter when it gets too hot. Chard grows year-round in temperate areas, is best harvested in late summer or early fall in colder areas, and fall through spring in warmer regions. We occasionally use chard as a side dish in our fall recipes.


Chiles are best at the end of summer and into fall. We use chilies often in our fall recipes, especially with Mexican dishes.


Eggplant comes into season towards the end of summer, but bright shiny heavy-feeling specimens stay in season well into fall. We occasionally use eggplant as a side dish in our fall recipes, especially with Mediterranean dishes.


Fennel has a natural season from fall through early spring. Like most cool weather crops, the plant bolts and turns bitter in warmer weather. We use fennel often in our recipes throughout the year, especially as one of our secret ingredients.


Garlic is another produce item that we forget has a season; fresh garlic is at its plump, sweetest best in late summer and fall. We use garlic often in our recipes throughout the year.


Green Beans tend to be sweetest and most tender during their natural season, from mid-summer into fall in most regions. We use green beans often in our Asian salads and also as a side.


Herbs of hearty sorts are available fresh in fall - we always look for bundles of rosemary, parsley, thyme, and sage. We usually dry our own spices.


Horseradish is at its best in fall and winter, but stores well and is often available in decent shape well into spring. We occasionally use horseradish in our fall recipes.


Kale is like all hearty cooking greens - cooler weather keeps it sweet. We use kale often in our recipes throughout fall and winter.


Leeks more than about 1 1/2 inches wide tend to have tough inner cores. The top green leaves should look fresh - avoid leeks with wilted tops. We use leeks occasionally in our recipes throughout fall and winter.


Lemongrass grows in warm and tropical areas and is usually available fresh in the U.S. towards mid-fall. We use lemongrass occasionally in our fall salads and Asian dishes.


Lettuce is in season somewhere in the U.S. year-round. It can also be grown in low-energy greenhouses in colder climates through the winter. We use lettuce often in our salad and wrap sandwich recipes throughout the year.


Onions come from storage all year round but most onions are harvested in late summer through the fall. We use onions often in our recipes throughout the year.


Peppers both sweet and spicy are harvested in late summer and early fall. We use peppers often in our recipes throughout the year.


Pumpkins are the most common winter squash and come into season in September in most areas. We use pumpkins often in our fall recipes. Pumpkin seeds are a staple for our power bowls throughout the year.


Radishes (all types) are so fast-growing that they can be sown several times during the growing season in most climates. Fall marks the end of the season for small red radishes and the beginning of the season for larger daikon-type radishes. We use radishes often in our recipes throughout the year.


Shallots are harvested in late summer and into fall and are at their sweetest when fresh. We use shallots often in our recipes throughout the year.


Spinach, indeed, has a season. It varies with your climate - year-round in temperate areas, summer and fall in cooler areas, fall through spring in warmers regions. We occasionally use spinach in our recipes throughout the year.


Wild Mushrooms have different seasons throughout the U.S. Most wild mushrooms other than morels are in season in summer through fall. We use wild mushrooms often in our recipes throughout the year.


Winter Squash of all sorts comes into season in early fall and usually last well into winter. We use winter squash occasionally in our recipes throughout the year.


Zucchini have a harvest season from summer into fall in most climates. We use zucchinis often in our recipes throughout the year.

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